Bringing language up to date on an out of copyright book.

Advice for those new to the concepts of copyright
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jennym
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Bringing language up to date on an out of copyright book.

Post by jennym » Wed Jun 20, 2012 10:04 am

This is probably so obvious for some, but it's important of course that I understand.

The book is out of copyright as the author has been dead long over 70 years. It is an autobiography of the author, with a preface written by the author.

As this book is written in antiquated language, which in this day and age is wordy and difficult to follow, is it legal for me to change some of the most obscure wording, to more modern wording, obviously with the same meaning of course?

The only reason for changing some of wording; is to make book easier to read for the majority of today's readers.

I would of course make a statement that some of the language has been brought up to date.

Would this be a problem?

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AndyJ
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Post by AndyJ » Wed Jun 20, 2012 11:03 am

Hi again Jenny,
Since the original work is out of copyright, there is no problem with you making an adaptation of it. Adaptation is the word used in the Copyright Designs and Patents Act to mean any changes such as translation, which would require the permission of the copyright owner if the work was in copyright.
21 Infringement by making adaptation or act done in relation to adaptation.
(1) The making of an adaptation of the work is an act restricted by the copyright in a literary, dramatic or musical work.
For this purpose an adaptation is made when it is recorded, in writing or otherwise.
(2)The doing of any of the acts specified in sections 17 to 20, or subsection (1) above, in relation to an adaptation of the work is also an act restricted by the copyright in a literary, dramatic or musical work.
For this purpose it is immaterial whether the adaptation has been recorded, in writing or otherwise, at the time the act is done.
(3) In this Part “adaptation”—
  • (a) in relation to a literary work, other than a computer program or a database, or in relation to a dramatic work, means—
    • (i) a translation of the work;
      (ii) a version of a dramatic work in which it is converted into a non-dramatic work or, as the case may be, of a non-dramatic work in which it is converted into a dramatic work;
      (iii) a version of the work in which the story or action is conveyed wholly or mainly by means of pictures in a form suitable for reproduction in a book, or in a newspaper, magazine or similar periodical;
    (ab) in relation to a computer program, means an arrangement or altered version of the program or a translation of it;
    (ac) in relation to a database, means an arrangement or altered version of the database or a translation of it;
    (b) in relation to a musical work, means an arrangement or transcription of the work.
(4) In relation to a computer program a “translation” includes a version of the program in which it is converted into or out of a computer language or code or into a different computer language or code
(5) No inference shall be drawn from this section as to what does or does not amount to copying a work.
Advice or comment provided here is not and does not purport to be legal advice as defined by s.12 of Legal Services Act 2007

jennym
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Post by jennym » Wed Jun 20, 2012 11:30 am

Andy, again 'Thanks'! You are such a star!

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